Tuesday

A Salute to Modern Art

SUNDAY, January 8 at 2:00 PM
A Salute to Modern Art

Producer Harvey Chertok presents the Hermitage Masterpieces of Modernism : Matisse, Picasso and more 20th Century Painters. One of the world’s greatest museums, the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia, showcases the colorful works of the Fauve artists, the singular creations of Matisse and the startling innovations of Picasso. Hear the amazing story of how this Hermitage video program was born.

Please register by calling 359-2244, Ext. 10

HOLIDAY HOURS






DECEMBER 24 - THE LIBRARY WILL CLOSE AT 1:00 PM
DECEMBER 25 - CHRISTMAS DAY ~ THE LIBRARY WILL BE CLOSED
DECEMBER 26 - CHRISTMAS DAY OBSERVED~ THE LIBRARY CLOSED
DECEMBER 31 - NEW YEAR'S EVE - THE LIBRARY WILL CLOSE AT 3:00PM

JANUARY 1 - NEW YEAR'S DAY ~ THE LIBRARY WILL BE CLOSED

THE LIBRARY WILL BE OPEN AS USUAL JANUARY 2ND

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE ORANGEBURG LIBRARY STAFF

Nooks and New E-books



The Nook Touch eBook Reader may be borrowed by Orangeburg Library cardholders 18 years and older who have had a library card for more than 90 days and have a clean borrowing record (i.e. no fines, no overdues, no lost items, no claims returned).

How to download eBooks onto your eBook Reader
Digital Download Center

The Orangeburg Library now has the following new e-books. Please click on one of the titles to reserve.
1105 Yakima Street, by Debbie Macomber.
Betrayal, by Fern Michaels.
Devious, by Lisa Jackson.
Escape, by Barbara Delinsky.
Happy Birthday, by Danielle Steel.
The Ideal Man, by Julie Garwood.
New York to Dallas, by J. D. Robb.
The Next Always, by Nora Roberts.
Prey, by Linda Howard.
Shock Wave, by John Sandford.
The Silent Girl, by Tess Gerritsen.
Split Second, by Catherine Coulter.
Beautiful Lies, by Lisa Unger.
The Black Echo, by Michael Connelly.
The Help, by Kathryn Stockett.
Smokin' Seventeen, by Janet Evanovich.
Summer Secrets, by Barbara Freethy

Thursday

PAT WICTOR CONCERT: AMERICAN FOLK, GOSPEL & BLUES

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18 at 2:00 PM

In a remarkably short time, Pat Wictor has become the name that is talked about on the acoustic, blues, folk and Americana circuits. Steeped in American “roots” music, Pat is a contemporary songwriter drawing from the rural country, gospel and blues traditions of our nation. Having music at his core, Pat grew up outside the U.S., and then came home to the music of America that resonated within him and inspired him as a musician.Back again, by popular demand, Pat Wictor and his guitar will delight and win you with a concert that is suitable for families, teens and adults. The Concert is free, but registration is strongly suggested.
Please call the library at 845-359-2244, Ext. 10 to sign up.

Tuesday

New DVDs




The Orangeburg Library now has the following new DVDs.

Super 8
Sarah's Key
Spy Kids: all the time in the world
Conan the Barbarian
The Devil's Double
Beginners
Larry Crowne
Pirates of the Caribbean
The Change-up
Atlas Shrugged
Family Guy
Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
Water for Elephants
Attack the Block
Captain America the First Avenger
A Better Life

Free Music Downloads for Orangeburg Library Cardholders

image

Download 3 songs per week.

Compatible with most devices.

No returns - music is yours to keep.

Music is provided from Sony Music Catalog.

Log on to www.orangeburg-library.org

Click on Freegal

You must have your library card and PIN.

Non-Orangeburg Cardholders, please check with your home library to see if they offer this service.

Wednesday

Symphony Coming Soon!

The  computer catalog and circulation system used by the Orangeburg Library is scheduled to be replaced during Dec 5-8, 2011. The Library participates in the shared ANSER (Automated Network Services) computer system used by 46 member libraries in the Ramapo Catskill Library System.

During the changeover to the new system (Dec. 5 to Dec. 8),  you will not be able to access the catalog or your library account. All current checkouts, fine blocks, and existing hold requests will be transferred to the new system. Lists that patrons have created on their own in the catalog will also be moved. You will be able to checkout new items. Items coming due during the ‘blackout’ period will be automatically extended and not subject to fines.

The new library catalog will have a different look, and will offer additional searching capabilities. Some materials owned by the Orangeburg Library may only be available for hold requests by patrons with Orangeburg  Library cards. To place a hold request during this period, please fill out a hold request form, available at the Adult Reference Desk or in the Childrens’ Room.

The ANSER libraries only change their software system every 7-10 years , so please be patient with the library staff as we get used to new workflows.

Monday

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY HOURS




THE LIBRARY WILL BE CLOSED AT 5 P.M.
ON WEDNESDAY NOV. 23
AND WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY ON THURSDAY NOV. 24.
THE LIBRARY WILL RESUME REGULAR HOURS ON FRIDAY NOV. 25.

REGULAR WEEKEND HOURS: SAT 10AM ~ 5PM / SUN 1PM ~ 5PM

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE ORANGEBURG LIBRARY STAFF!

Wednesday

Top - of - the - Stairs Gallery

November and December:

Artist, Trudy Regan, collaborates with her husband, photographer and computer artist, Dan Regan. The resulting collage prints reflect the couples’ dynamic and spirited personalities. The colors, images, and inherent movement of the art will stun you with their creativity.

Tuesday

Chair Yoga with Colleen Briscoe



Tuesdays, November 15, 29, December 6 and 13 at 1:00 PM

Four sessions of Chair Yoga with Colleen Briscoe is now being offered on Tuesdays. The same stretches and movements will aid in flexibility, balance, circulation and relaxation.

Please call the library at 845-359-2244. Ext. 10 to register

“ROSIE: the RIVETER:” A 70th ANNIVERSARY SALUTE to WW II



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13 at 2:00 PM



"Rosie the Riveter" is the star of this special video program which highlights the sweeping social transformation that rocked American society on the Home Front from 1941-1945. At the 70th Anniversary of World War II, it is a good time to reflect on how America has changed. For example, as men left their jobs to enlist in the Armed Forces, millions of women joined the labor force as factories expanded to fill the needs of wartime production. American movie and radio stars such as Bob Hope, The Andrews Sisters, Abbott and Costello, and many others supporting the war effort by entertaining our troops and selling War Bonds.

This nostalgic documentary, presented by producer Harvey Chertok, includes newsreels, propaganda, movies, music and humor to show how traditional American ideals, lifestyles, morals and ethics changed during the war.



Please call the library at 845-359-2244, Ext. 10 to sign up.

Wednesday

Be a Jr. or Teen book reviewer.


Love to read?
Want to share your opinion?
Be a Jr. or Teen book reviewer.

Jr. Book Reviewer grades 4-6
Teen Book Reviewer grades 7-12

Check out a book with a NEW Sticker on spine.
It can be a fiction or non-fiction or a Graphic Novel.

Your review should answer the following questions:
·         What is the book about (theme as well as plot)?
·         What kind of reader would like this book? What grade?
·         What other books would you suggest for someone
who liked it? Are they already owned by the library?
·         Is the cover any good (i.e. would it attract readers?)

On a scale of 1-5, how popular do you think the book will be?
1 - No one will want to read it except for assignments.
2 – Only for person who has special interest in subject matter
3 – Will appeal to reader if recommended
4 – Will have general appeal
5 – Everyone will be in a rush to read it.

To submit a review, you can give it to Angela  or email it to akrajcar@rcls.org subject Library book review.
Don’t forget to include book title, author, your name and grade. (Initials only will be included in published reviews.)

BOOK & BAG LUNCH GROUP

Everyone is welcome to join the group. Bring your lunch; the Library provides dessert. Books are available one month before the discussion. Note the differences in days and times.

Wednesday, October 12 at 12 Noon - The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski
Wednesday, November 16 at 12 Noon - 31 Hours by Masha Hamilton
Wednesday, December 14 at 12 Noon - The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Monday

Patron Book Reviews

A Hard Death by Jonathan Hayes


Gripping, nail-biting throughout the entire book. Highly recommend it!









American Buffalo: In search of a lost icon by Steven Rinella



American Buffalo was my first experience reading an ebook. I found both the book and the experience fascinating. As an avid outdoors enthusiast, Rinella's account of his Alaskan buffalo-hunting experience was informative and entertaining. The ebook experience less so -- the page formatting was awkward (footnotes spread over several screens) and my assumption that ebooks could be read in the dark proved incorrect.






Shanghai Girls by Lisa See



Lissa See's novels are all terrific. Aside from learning Chinese history (this time during the 20th century in Shanghai and California) I was mesmerized by the story of 2 sisters whose comfortable lives are drastically changed by circumstances beyond their control. Can't wait to read her sequel, which was just released.






100 Simple Things You Can Do To Prevent Alzheimer's by Jean Carper


This book had fantastic tips for not only preventing Alzheimer's disease in old age, but tips for daily living to prolong life. It has wonderful tips and suggestions for a helathy lifestyle.










Thursday

Raffle Prize Winner

Congratulations to Brendan Lee! Brendan won a $25 gift certificate to Glaze Pottery and Art Studio. Brendan was selected from all the children who joined the library's summer reading program.  Have fun Brendan and Thank you to Glaze Pottery for donating the gift certificate.


Wednesday

Honey Tasting -- FRIDAY



Come sample honeys from around the world! Learn how to find the purest and best honey, and why honey bees in the U.S. are having a hard time. 10-2:30 at the Adult Reference desk August 19th.

Monday

Patron Book Reviews

Children of the Street by Kwei Quartey



Set in the slums of Accra, Ghana's capitol, this is the second book featuring Inspector Darko Dawson. THis gritty, suspenseful novel goes beyond anything that the No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency would tackle.




Amy Knapp's Family Organizing Handbook by Amy Knapp


This book had great tips and helped figure out the logistics of a busy family, like ours. I highly recommend this book if you are aiming for a smoothly running day-to-day.



In the Basement of the Ivory Tower by Professor X



Funny, insightful look at higher education the the U.S. (a kind of misanthropic view, however).





When Skateboards Will Be Free by Said Sayrafiezadeh



A hilarious observation of the childhood of a left wing family in the U.S. in the 70's.

Salt Tasting at the Library, Thursday 10-5!



Try salts from around the world, as part of our summer reading theme, "Novel Destinations". Learn the major differences between salts, and some of the things to be aware of as a consumer. Thursday 10-5 at the Adult Reference desk.

Tuesday

Chocolate Tasting at the Library!


Join us for tasting organic and Fair Trade chocolate from around the world! Wednesday 10-5.

Friday

Evolution of the book -

Very interesting article about books, reading, and interactivity and the eBook. BTW, the library has just purchased 3 'New' Nooks that will be available for borrowing shortly. Watch this space.

Monday

Patron Book Reviews

Orangeburg patrons read these books for the Summer Reading Raffle, and had this to say . . .

Man of My Dreams by Curtis Sittenfeld


Lame title but clever writing. Fun coming of age story.





Your Voice in My Head by Emma Forrest




A brilliant memoir by a young, talented woman who is self-destructive, attempts suicide and is saved by a wise psychiatrist. Accounts of their sessions are fascinating. An outstanding book!




Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor by Lisa Kleypas



Heartwarming and uplifting!





Oogy by Larry Levin



Sweet book -- can be finished in a hour.






I'll Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark



Lot's of characters and twists -- fun read!





Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins
This is the final, satisfying volume in The Hunger Games trilogy. I was sorry to come to the end of the journey, the conclusion of this well-written dystopian series. Don't be put off by the YA (Young Adult) label.





Groundswell by Katie Lee


Entertaining, fast read, twist to the ending!






Mystery by Jonathan Kellerman


Another Alex Delaware mystery. Pretty similar to the others with convoluted plot and more false leads than real ones. The good part is that Kellerman writes very well and his characters are more itneresting than his plot lines. A pretty good summer read.



Elizabeth I by Margaret George



This is an excellent novel that brings vividly to life the court of Elizabeth I, filled with the great men of that age -- Shakespeare, Spenser, Drake, Marlowe, and many others. It does justice to history, but manages to tell a fascinating story as well.

The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery





Very good with much to think about. Well written. My only criticism is that for a book that criticizes pretension is is sometimes pretentious itself. Worth reading!


Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese

I missed the book blub session on Cutting for Stone but it was highly recommended so I read it anyway. This was a magnificent sweep of a novel, historically accurate and absorbing. The characters were sympathetic and real and the story never faltered. The first person narrative only missed the mark when the main character described events that happened when he was comatose and never told us how he got his information. A minor flaw in a gripping novel.


Hardball by Sara Paretsky



This book features V.I. Warshawski, the author's female private eye character. Racial tensions and police corruption in Chicago are portrayed realistically. The book is listed among NPR's 100 best thrillers, as voted by the readers.



The Cry of the Sloth by Sam Savage



Pithy, funny, laugh out loud, sardonic, acerbic, etc. -- so gloomy it's brilliant




Watch Me Die by Erica Spindler






Couldn't put it down -- sorry when I finished it!



Vienna Twilight by Frank Tallis



This is the fifth in a series of mysteries set in the Vienna of 1903. Detective Inspector Oskar Reinhardt and Dr. Max Liebermann, a disciple of Sigmund Freud, tackle a series of murders while revealing aspects of Vienna's social, political, and musical profile. This book delves into psychosexual matters more deeply (and darkly) than the previous books.


Tryin' to Sleep in the Bed You Made by Donna Grant and Virginia DeBerry


In this book, one of the characters makes a 10-year run of a career in the acting business, as assistant to a movie producer. Her childhood friend has a job working housekeeping in a hotel. In all, there are four main characters who are friends, but one gets shot, and the three remaining drift apart as they grow up. There is an interesting twist in this book, and as the title suggests, the characters have to deal with the outcomes of decisions they made early on.


High Profile by Robert Parker





Parker continues to amaze with this intriguing plot and characters and LOL humor.

Sunday

10th Annual Adult Summer Reading Raffle

July 1 - August 12



Beginning July 1, the Orangeburg Library is sponsoring an Adult Reading Raffle. Here’s how it works. Fill out a short book review form or take a fun world destinations quiz. Put it in our drawing box at the reference desk to win weekly gift cards. You can enter as many times as you like.

Your book reviews will be posted anonymously on our library blog. The theme for this year’s Adult Summer Reading Program is “Novel Destinations,” so check out the displays that feature interesting places around the world. Visit Cheryl at the Adult Reference desk for tastings of salt, honey, and chocolate from around the world!


Adult Programs

New DVDs

The Orangeburg Library now has the following new DVDs. Please click on one of the titles to reserve.

Company Men
Just Go With It
Sanctum
True Grit
Madeline and Her Friends (children's)
Battle Los Angeles
Big Momma: Like Father, Like Son
Hall Pass
Kill the Irishman
N-Secure
Red Riding Hood
Adjustment Bureau
Cedar Rapids
Diary of a Wimpy Kid - Rodrick Rules
Eagle
Unknown
Rocko's Modern Life Season 1 (children's)
Beastly
Season of the Witch
Sucker Punch
The Warrior's Way

Chair Yoga with Colleen Briscoe

3 Mondays in June - June 6, 13, 20 at 1:00 PM
It’s back! Chair Yoga with Colleen Briscoe

Once again, stretch all your joints and muscles for a healthier, calmer approach to movement and flexability. Colleen provides both the atmosphere and skill to help you achieve better circulation and balance in this gentle yoga. Registration is necessary.

Thursday

BOOK & BAG LUNCH GROUP

Tuesday, June 21 at 12:00 Noon
“Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese

Everyone is welcome to join the group. Feel free to bring your lunch and the Library provides dessert. Books are available one month before the discussion. Note: Differences in Days and Times.

The Humor of Molly Goldberg

Sunday, June 12 at 2:00 PM
“The Humor of Molly Goldberg” – presented by raconteur and author, Marjorie Gottlieb Wolfe

Long before Lucille Ball, “Molly” hung out of her kitchen window dispensing motherly advice. Her signature “Yoo-Hoo, Mrs, Bloom,” became a national catch phrase. And while you are laughing, discover the courage of the innovative television pioneer, Gertrude Berg, who created a legend and a role model for women.
Please register by calling the library at 359-2244, Ext. 10

Wednesday

DVD Circulation changes

You asked for it and we did it! Older DVDs and VHS movies can now be borrowed for 7 days.  New DVDs and Blu-Rays are still 3 days.  TV series and Documentaries are 14 days. Remember to check your receipts for due dates.  Sign up for email notification reminders. Overdue fines are still $2 per day. Limit of 10 movies per card.

Sunday

Every Shallow Cut



Every Shallow Cut

by Tom Piccirilli


Reading can sometimes be hard going when the story is about someone having a hard go of it, hanging off the edge of sanity. But although you can feel Piccirilli’s protagonist’s fingers getting slippery, his hold on the precipice getting more and more uncertain as the story progresses, this book sweeps you along, and you will finish it in a just a few hours. This is partly because the book is only 162 pages, the pages are small, and the spacing is wide. It is also because the writing is fluid, unpretentious, real. And the protagonist could be you, or me, or anyone we know. Not that you or I would end up on the last page, doing whatever it is he decides to do. We’re not sure what happens in the end, and that’s probably a good thing, as it might allow the reader to create distance, to say, “WELL! I would NEVER do THAT!” What he actually does may also be beside the point. The thought processes that lead up to the action are the real focus. And the scariest part of it all – the reason Piccirilli’s work is in the suspense/thriller genre – is that the devastating life events and the grief that results are so undeniably real that, if we’re honest, we can’t draw a thick line between ourselves and the protagonist. There is a part of us that is revolted – and a part of us that understands. Readers may find that compassion to be more frightening than out-and-out terror.

Wednesday

The Red Garden


Alice Hoffman finds the part of us that feels the world instinctively, and brings it into kinship with every aspect of the physical world. Transported by her language of flora and fauna, we arrive in a spiritual world where physics and spirit cannot be separated.

Less magical than its predecessors, The Red Garden is for that reason more enthralling. Hoffman has, at times, taken the magical bit a bit too far. But here, as in The Story Sisters, she carries us on the back of bears and the wings of bees into reality, raw and subtle at the same time.

Each chapter is a story unto itself, and could stand alone in a collection of short stories. Yet there are threads woven throughout, linking the generations of inhabitants in one small Massachusetts town from one end of 300 years to the other. And it is in these links, disguised as mere folklore or gossip or impossible legend, that meaning is found.

If you are an Alice Hoffman fan, you will love this book. If you have liked some of her work and been disappointed by some, you will love this book. If you have not read Alice Hoffman, this is as good a place as any to begin your devotion.